Friday, 20 January 2017

40 Uses for WD-40

  1. Removes grime from book covers.
  2. Prevents mud and clay from sticking to shovels and boots.
  3. Removes grease and oil stains on clothes.
  4. Cleans chrome fixtures in bathrooms.
  5. Makes puck slide faster on a hockey table.
  6. Cleans and softens paint brushes.
  7. Cleans and protects cowboy boots.
  8. Removes crayon from walls, carpet, wallpaper, plastics, shoes, toys, chalkboard, monitors, screen doors, and rock walls.
  9. Cleans piano keys.
  10. Softens new baseball gloves.

 

2016-03-10-1457648026-9876507-Fotolia_38595324_Subscription_Monthly_M.jpg

 

  1. Removes super strong glue from fingers.
  2. Keeps wicker chairs from squeaking.
  3. Removes scuff marks from ceramic floors.
  4. Cleans and protects copper pots and pans.
  5. Polishes and shines sea shells.
  6. Removes water spots from mirrors.
  7. Removes tea stains from counter tops.
  8. Removes ink from carpet.
  9. Keeps metal wind chimes rust free.
  10. Keeps pigeons off window ledges (they hate the smell).

 

2016-03-10-1457648067-1420883-Fotolia_66878802_Subscription_Monthly_M.jpg

 

  1. Prevents mildew growth on outdoor fountains.
  2. Removes gunk from plastic dish drainers.
  3. Cleans dog doo from tennis shoes.
  4. Removes tomato stains from clothing.
  5. Gets ink stains out of leather.
  6. Removes roller-skate marks from kitchen floor.
  7. Unkinks gold chains.
  8. Penetrates frozen mailbox doors.
  9. Removes tar from shoes.
  10. Removes a stuck ring from a finger.

 

2016-03-10-1457647617-9827638-Fotolia_73150776_Subscription_Monthly_M.jpg

 

  1. Cleans silver plates and trays.
  2. Removes soap scum in the bathroom.
  3. Polishes wood.
  4. Takes the squeak out of shoes.
  5. Wipes off graffiti.
  6. Removes Silly Putty from carpet.
  7. Loosens burrs, thistles, and stickers from dogs and horses.
  8. Removes bumper stickers from cars.
  9. Removes duct tape.
  10. Really Odd Use! When John Glenn circled the earth in 1962, his spacecraft, Friendship VII, was slathered in WD-40 from top to bottom. NASA engineers hoped it would reduce friction upon reentry.
  11. Really Odd Use! In 2001 a burglar in Medford, Oregon, broke into an apartment wielding a can of WD-40. He sprayed the occupant with the lubricant and demanded money, then escaped with the man’s wallet and car keys (but was later apprehended)

Read more here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gordon-javna/40-uses-for-wd40_b_9432836.html

40 Uses for WD-40 was originally published to http://dublin.expertsanding.ie


40 Uses for WD-40

  1. Removes grime from book covers.
  2. Prevents mud and clay from sticking to shovels and boots.
  3. Removes grease and oil stains on clothes.
  4. Cleans chrome fixtures in bathrooms.
  5. Makes puck slide faster on a hockey table.
  6. Cleans and softens paint brushes.
  7. Cleans and protects cowboy boots.
  8. Removes crayon from walls, carpet, wallpaper, plastics, shoes, toys, chalkboard, monitors, screen doors, and rock walls.
  9. Cleans piano keys.
  10. Softens new baseball gloves.

 

2016-03-10-1457648026-9876507-Fotolia_38595324_Subscription_Monthly_M.jpg

 

  1. Removes super strong glue from fingers.
  2. Keeps wicker chairs from squeaking.
  3. Removes scuff marks from ceramic floors.
  4. Cleans and protects copper pots and pans.
  5. Polishes and shines sea shells.
  6. Removes water spots from mirrors.
  7. Removes tea stains from counter tops.
  8. Removes ink from carpet.
  9. Keeps metal wind chimes rust free.
  10. Keeps pigeons off window ledges (they hate the smell).

 

2016-03-10-1457648067-1420883-Fotolia_66878802_Subscription_Monthly_M.jpg

 

  1. Prevents mildew growth on outdoor fountains.
  2. Removes gunk from plastic dish drainers.
  3. Cleans dog doo from tennis shoes.
  4. Removes tomato stains from clothing.
  5. Gets ink stains out of leather.
  6. Removes roller-skate marks from kitchen floor.
  7. Unkinks gold chains.
  8. Penetrates frozen mailbox doors.
  9. Removes tar from shoes.
  10. Removes a stuck ring from a finger.

 

2016-03-10-1457647617-9827638-Fotolia_73150776_Subscription_Monthly_M.jpg

 

  1. Cleans silver plates and trays.
  2. Removes soap scum in the bathroom.
  3. Polishes wood.
  4. Takes the squeak out of shoes.
  5. Wipes off graffiti.
  6. Removes Silly Putty from carpet.
  7. Loosens burrs, thistles, and stickers from dogs and horses.
  8. Removes bumper stickers from cars.
  9. Removes duct tape.
  10. Really Odd Use! When John Glenn circled the earth in 1962, his spacecraft, Friendship VII, was slathered in WD-40 from top to bottom. NASA engineers hoped it would reduce friction upon reentry.
  11. Really Odd Use! In 2001 a burglar in Medford, Oregon, broke into an apartment wielding a can of WD-40. He sprayed the occupant with the lubricant and demanded money, then escaped with the man’s wallet and car keys (but was later apprehended)

Read more here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gordon-javna/40-uses-for-wd40_b_9432836.html

40 Uses for WD-40 was originally published to http://dublin.expertsanding.ie

Monday, 16 January 2017

7 Clever Ways to Corral Your Cords and Wires

Not only are loose cords and wires super unattractive, it’s actually dangerous to leave them lying in a jumble on your floor or desk. According to Hometalker and safety expert Elli Bishop, of SafeWise.com, having loose wires in your home creates a risk of electrical fires, not to mention wires and cords on the floor are a tripping hazard. Avoid that potentially painful (and awkward) situation, and clear that unsightly mess, with these 7 DIY cord organizers!

1. Reuse empty TP rolls

2015-02-12-1cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Laura @Bright, Bold, & BeautifulThe easiest way to corral unneeded lengths of cord, or to store a cord that’s not currently in use, is to coil it up and keep it in an empty toilet paper tube. To add a drop of style, cover the tube in paint or decorate with washi tape.

2.Try painters tape (with a twist)

2015-02-12-2cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Jae @Design OCDUse your furniture to hide stray cords, by taping your cords to the backs and legs of tables, dressers, or desks. Keep the tape from standing out by spray painting it the color of your furniture before using it.

3. Corral small cords with a clothespin

2015-02-12-3cord.jpg
Project via Kim @This Is KnockoutHave you ever had that annoying experience where you reach into your bag or pocket and instantly tangle your fingers in your headphone cord or charging cable? Turns out, the solution is sitting in your laundry room!

4. Create your own cord wrap-up

2015-02-12-4cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Sharlotte @Sharlotte’s ReflectionsTurn a scrap of fabric and a button into an easy cord organizer, perfect for corralling extra lengths of cord under your desk, behind your TV, or wherever your cords are causing chaos.

5. DIY a counter top charging station

2015-02-12-5cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Christina @The DIY MommyOne of the most dangerous areas for loose cords, wires, and electronics, is on or around your countertops, where they can accidentally come into contact with water. Build this safe cord storage stand, so you can stay safe and hands free while following that recipe on your tablet.

6. Hide your cords in furniture

2015-02-12-6cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Nancy @Artsy Chicks RuleWant to make your cord clutter disappear without giving up your Internet? Hide your cords and wires in a piece of furniture, by leaving the back of the piece open and placing it against the outlet on the wall.

7. Build a shelf for power strip storage

2015-02-12-7cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Isabelle @Engineer Your SpaceInstead of leaving a power strip full of chargers or cords on the floor or desktop, build a wall mounted shelf, to conceal the strip and all of your attached cords.

Read more here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hometalk/7-clever-ways-to-corral-y_b_6669132.html

If you would like to get in touch with us about any floor sanding needs you may have you can do so by using the contact page on our website to get in touch

The post 7 Clever Ways to Corral Your Cords and Wires was first published to Expert Sanding – Dublin


7 Clever Ways to Corral Your Cords and Wires

Not only are loose cords and wires super unattractive, it’s actually dangerous to leave them lying in a jumble on your floor or desk. According to Hometalker and safety expert Elli Bishop, of SafeWise.com, having loose wires in your home creates a risk of electrical fires, not to mention wires and cords on the floor are a tripping hazard. Avoid that potentially painful (and awkward) situation, and clear that unsightly mess, with these 7 DIY cord organizers!

1. Reuse empty TP rolls

2015-02-12-1cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Laura @Bright, Bold, & Beautiful
The easiest way to corral unneeded lengths of cord, or to store a cord that’s not currently in use, is to coil it up and keep it in an empty toilet paper tube. To add a drop of style, cover the tube in paint or decorate with washi tape.

2.Try painters tape (with a twist)

2015-02-12-2cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Jae @Design OCD
Use your furniture to hide stray cords, by taping your cords to the backs and legs of tables, dressers, or desks. Keep the tape from standing out by spray painting it the color of your furniture before using it.

3. Corral small cords with a clothespin

2015-02-12-3cord.jpg
Project via Kim @This Is Knockout
Have you ever had that annoying experience where you reach into your bag or pocket and instantly tangle your fingers in your headphone cord or charging cable? Turns out, the solution is sitting in your laundry room!

4. Create your own cord wrap-up

2015-02-12-4cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Sharlotte @Sharlotte’s Reflections
Turn a scrap of fabric and a button into an easy cord organizer, perfect for corralling extra lengths of cord under your desk, behind your TV, or wherever your cords are causing chaos.

5. DIY a counter top charging station

2015-02-12-5cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Christina @The DIY Mommy
One of the most dangerous areas for loose cords, wires, and electronics, is on or around your countertops, where they can accidentally come into contact with water. Build this safe cord storage stand, so you can stay safe and hands free while following that recipe on your tablet.

6. Hide your cords in furniture

2015-02-12-6cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Nancy @Artsy Chicks Rule
Want to make your cord clutter disappear without giving up your Internet? Hide your cords and wires in a piece of furniture, by leaving the back of the piece open and placing it against the outlet on the wall.

7. Build a shelf for power strip storage

2015-02-12-7cord.jpg
Project via Hometalker Isabelle @Engineer Your Space
Instead of leaving a power strip full of chargers or cords on the floor or desktop, build a wall mounted shelf, to conceal the strip and all of your attached cords.

Read more here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hometalk/7-clever-ways-to-corral-y_b_6669132.html

If you would like to get in touch with us about any floor sanding needs you may have you can do so by using the contact page on our website to get in touch

The post 7 Clever Ways to Corral Your Cords and Wires was first published to Expert Sanding - Dublin

Thursday, 5 January 2017

The 6 Best Home Flooring Ideas and Options

FlooringAre you thinking about replacing flooring in your home? Consider the costs, benefits, and the downsides of each type of flooring before you commit. Here is a list of the most popular types of flooring, their pros and cons, and the rooms for which they are best suited.

1. Hardwoods

Costs: Depending on the type of hardwoods you go with, it could cost you anywhere from $3 to $12 per square foot. Engineered wood will cost you a little less. On top of the cost of materials, you will need to pay to get it installed which will likely run you in the hundreds or thousands of dollars.

Pros: Hardwoods look very nice and have a great resale value. They are easy to clean and maintain and usually only require vacuuming.

Cons: The cost is the largest drawback. Like tile, hardwoods are also loud to walk on. Real hardwoods also need refinishing occasionally in high-traffic areas. Standing water can also ruin hardwoods.

Best Rooms: The best place to put hardwoods is in a living room. It looks good and is stylish. It is not a high-traffic area such as a foyer so the would can remain protected. You can also use a rug to muffle the noise a bit.

2. Tile

Costs: There are many different types of tile. It can range in price from $1 to $20 a square foot. Professional installation can run into the hundreds of dollars depending on the size of the area.

Pros: Glazed ceramic tile is very durable and resistant to scratches. It is water resistant. Tile comes in a variety of sizes and materials, such as marble, porcelain, travertine, slate, and granite. Additionally, tile is fairly easy to clean, and stains are not much of a concern.

Cons: Tile can be very loud to walk on and echos. It can also be cold, and heating systems for tile are very expensive. Tile can crack and can be difficult to repair. The grout gets stained and needs to be cleaned.

Best Rooms: Since tile is water resistant, it is perfect for a bathroom or a kitchen. It may also work well in a dining area where food and drinks tend to be spilled frequently.

3. Laminate

Costs: Again, this ranges in price, but I have seen it anywhere from $0.50 to $3 a square foot. You will also have to pay for installation.

Pros: My favorite thing about laminate is that it does not easily scratch. And if it does, a little vegetable oil rubbed on the scratch will get it right out. It also can look like real wood or tile, and it can even be difficult to tell if it is real or not. Like hardwoods, laminate is easy to clean. You can even make your own cheap and natural house cleaners. It is also great for pets because they can’t scratch or stain it.

Cons: Standing water will ruin laminate flooring. I learned this the hard way after having a refrigerator leak, and I ended up having to replace all the flooring in my kitchen. If the laminate does get ruined, unlike read hardwoods, laminate can not be refinished.

Best Rooms: Laminate is great for high traffic areas such as a foyer or any room with a lot of activity because of its durability. I highly recommend not putting it in a kitchen, bathroom, or a laundry room since laminate should not get wet.

4. Carpet

Costs: The cost of carpet varies greatly depending on the quality. However, standard carpeting and padding is between $2 and $5 per square foot. There are usually decent installation deals at Lowe’s and Home Depot for around $50.

Pros: Carpet not only feels soft, but it also gives a soft look to a room. It is quiet to walk on and prevents echoing throughout a home. Carpet is quick and simple to install and can go over uneven subfloors.

Cons: Although advancements in fiber technology have enabled carpet to be more stain-resistant, it still gets stained. Even when vacuumed frequently, it still may contain hidden dirt. When my husband and I tore up our old carpet, it had mounds of dirt underneath it. Carpet also needs to be steam-cleaned occasionally to keep it fresh. Additionally, carpet is not good for people with allergies.

Best Rooms: The best location for carpet is low traffic rooms, such as bedrooms, to minimize the dirt that gets trapped in it. It also gives bedrooms a more cozy look and feel.

5. Vinyl

Costs: Vinyl can cost less than $1 per square foot on the low end but can cost up to $5 per square foot on the high end. Installation is a couple hundred dollars.

Pros: Like carpet, vinyl is quiet and easy on your feet. It is inexpensive compared to some of the other flooring types.

Cons: Although vinyl has come a long way and can be made to look like wood or tile, it still does not look as good as the real thing. Vinyl dents and tears easily, and I have found that it can be a challenge to clean.

Best Rooms: Vinyl is great for a laundry room as it can shield a lot of the sound from your laundry machines. It could also work well in bathrooms and the kitchen because of the warmth it adds.

6. Cork

Costs: Again, there is a range of prices: $2 to $8 per square foot.

Pros: Cork is a good insulator. It is warm, soft, and absorbs sounds. Cork is a natural material, so it is environmentally friendly. Also, since it’s antimicrobial and resistant to mold, it’s safe for the family.

Cons: Since cork is a natural material, it will fade in direct sunlight. It also has been known to turn yellow with time. Because of the moldable nature of cork, it may get damaged underneath furniture pressure points. It will also swell when it is in standing water.

Best Rooms: Cork would work great in bedrooms because of it softness and warmth.

(Photo Credit: neoliminal)

First seen here: http://www.moneycrashers.com/best-home-flooring-ideas-and-options/

The post The 6 Best Home Flooring Ideas and Options was originally published on ExpertSanding – Dublin