Monday, 12 December 2016

A weird but wonderful pairing: Tiles and wood

New York interior designers Britt and Damian Zunino of Studio DB have been experimenting with this trend, including in ...
WILLIAM COVINTREE

New York interior designers Britt and Damian Zunino of Studio DB have been experimenting with this trend, including in their home.

Don’t knock it till you try it. Combining hexagonal tiles directly into wood might sound like a strange interiors combination, but it is fast becoming a trend that’s solving transitional flooring dilemmas worldwide.

Going against years of neatly separated spaces, the method involves blending the edge of an area of hexagonal tiles directly into wood, and it’s a movement that has recently flooded Pinterest.

Until recently the clever grouping of these materials has traditionally been reserved for cafes and restaurants as seen in the Bangkok eatery below.

New York interior designers Britt and Damian Zunino of Studio DB have been experimenting with this trend, including in their home, and say it’s easy to achieve.

“The first step is getting your contractor on board, but the actual work isn’t that complicated,” they told MyDomaine. 

“We had the advantage of designing a similar floor for a loft in TriBeCa before our own home,” Britt Zunino says.

“In that project, as well as our own, the bathtub is in an open master suite. We loved the idea of the tile anchoring the bathtub…[and] of the tile bleeding into a softer material like wood,” she says.

The distinction between the materials works to define the space and creates an interesting texture.

There is also the opportunity to play with colour combinations using different tile samples.

In New Zealand, The Tile Depot general manager Mike Sydall says the idea solves the problem of how to finish one area of flooring and start another – something people have struggled with for years.

Wooden floors are common in New Zealand homes, but Kiwis also love tiles, he says, so this is an interesting fix.

“Transition areas have long been an unattractive patch job. This is a really eye-catching solution,” Sydall says. “I love it.”

Tilers often dislike hexagonal tiles because it’s more difficult to achieve a smooth edge, Sydall says.

“But this is a great way to overcome this,” he says. “You’d need a good wood-cutter and tiler to make this happen.”

Read more: http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/home-property/86684842/A-weird-but-wonderful-pairing-Tiles-and-wood

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